Jaune Quick-to-See Smith

1940 | Montana, United States
Informations

American lithographer and painter.

Born in the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Indian Reservation in Montana, Jaune Quick-to-See Smith is one of the most influential North American indigenous artists. Abandoned by her mother at the age of two, she lived in various cities and reserves in California and Washington. Having studied in several universities, she holds four honorary doctorates, among other degrees. Since the 1970s, she has developed a practice of abstract painting and lithographs, based on complex networks of lines and colours. The use of glued mixed materials, such as newspaper, creates surfaces with rich and complex textures. The combination of commercial slogans, layers of text, scribbled drawings and paint drippings, as well as objects integrated into installations, make these abstract works hybrid and complex realisations, which nonetheless include figurative motifs. Her work, present in various prestigious collections, has been the subject of more than one hundred solo exhibitions, and has won her the Joan Mitchell prize.

Notably through overlays and collages, she mixes Indian traditions with American modernity, giving her work a political discourse on the subject of cultural appropriation. She describes herself as a “cultural art worker.” Her works bring into play various elements linked to tribal art as well as environmental concerns. In Flathead Vest: Father and Child (1996), a traditional vest is painted onto an ensemble of images: floral motifs, a 19th century photograph of an Indian father and son, as well as a text about food additives. This confrontation recurs in her other pieces, particularly in several of her lithographs: Winds of Change (1992) combines images of teepees, horses and geometric symbols with that of  trucks and planes, all brands of contemporary society that contradict the traditional world of indigenous reserves.

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Marion Daniel

Translated from French by Katia Porro.

From the Dictionnaire universel des créatrices
© 2013 Des femmes – Antoinette Fouque
© Archives of Women Artists, Research and Exhibitions
Jaune Quick-to-See  Smith — AWARE Women artists / Femmes artistes

Jaune Quick-to-See Smith, Homeland, 2017, mixed media on canvas, 121.92 x 182.88 cm, Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, © Jaune Quick-To-See Smith

Jaune Quick-to-See  Smith — AWARE Women artists / Femmes artistes

Jaune Quick-to-See Smith, Ghost Dance Dress, 2000, oil collage and mixed medias on canvas, 182.9 x 121.9 cm, Brooklyn Museum, © Jaune Quick-To-See Smith

Jaune Quick-to-See  Smith — AWARE Women artists / Femmes artistes

Jaune Quick-to-See Smith, Salmon Jumping, 2003, mixed media on paper, 77.66 x 104.14 cm, ASU Art Museum Collection, © Photo: Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts, © Jaune Quick-To-See Smith

Jaune Quick-to-See  Smith — AWARE Women artists / Femmes artistes

Jaune Quick-to-See Smith, Spam, 1995, acrylic, mixed media, 155.15 x 129.54 cm, The University of Arizone Museum of Art, © Jaune Quick-To-See Smith

Jaune Quick-to-See  Smith — AWARE Women artists / Femmes artistes

Jaune Quick-to-See Smith, State Names, 2000, oil, collage and mixed media on canvas, 121.9 x 182.9 cm, Smithsonian American Art Museum, © Jaune Quick-To-See Smith

Jaune Quick-to-See  Smith — AWARE Women artists / Femmes artistes

Jaune Quick-to-See Smith, Untitled from the portfolio Indian Self-Rule, 1983, color lithograph on paper, Smithsonian American Art Museum, © Jaune Quick-To-See Smith

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